Southern Cover Crop Conference Videos

Southern Cover Crop Conference Videos

Southern Cover Crop Conference Videos

Southern SARE, in conjunction with the Center for Environmental Farming Systems, held a Southern Cover Crop Conference in the summer of 2016. The event brought together researchers, Extension personnel, farmers and other ag industry professionals to discuss and learn about cover crop research, results and education across the South.

Part of the conference involved field demonstrations of cover crop technologies and production practices from a variety of university and ag industry specialists. The following videos, created by Velasquez Media, highlight some of these demonstrations, including using equipment for cover crops in conservation systems, cover crop production in high tunnels, growing summer cover crops in organic strawberries, reseeding cover crops in a cotton rotation, grazing summer cover crops in livestock production, and mechanical termination of various cover crops species.

Published by the Southern Region of the Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) program. Funded by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), Southern SARE operates under cooperative agreements with the University of Georgia, Fort Valley State University, and the Kerr Center for Sustainable Agriculture to offer competitive grants to advance sustainable agriculture in America's Southern region. This material is based upon work that is supported by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture, through Southern Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education, under sub-award number: SC14-001. USDA is an equal opportunity employer and service provider. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Product specs
Format: Videos
Year: 2016
Location: North Carolina | South
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This material is based upon work that is supported by the National Institute of Food and Agriculture, U.S. Department of Agriculture through the Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education (SARE) program. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the U.S. Department of Agriculture or SARE.